Top 5 Lead Indian Cricketer of All time And Their Bio


1. Suresh Raina

He was born in 27 November 1986) is an Indian international cricketer. An aggressive left-handed middle-order batsman and an occasional off-spin bowler,  he is also regarded as one of the best fielders in world cricket. He plays for Uttar Pradesh in all forms of domestic cricket.  He was the captain of the Gujarat Lions in the Indian Premier League, and is the vice-captain of the Chennai Super Kings.
He has also captained the Indian cricket team and is the second-youngest player ever to captain India. He is the first of the three Indian batsmen to ever score a century in all three formats of international cricket. Arguably among India's finest T20 batsmen, Suresh Raina stormed into the international scene as a teenage prodigy during the Greg Chappell regime. Typical left-hander's elegance, power game and a fine temperament were the hallmark of Raina the batsman and he exhibited it beautifully during his ODI debut in 2005. A big example of Raina's big match temperament was the way he chipped in during the 2011 quarterfinal against Australia and then the semifinal against Pakistan. Both were cameos statistically but were worth its weight in gold. There were several such instances of him taking India across the line in pressure situations. The lofted inside out drive and an agricultural hock over mid-wicket are the trademark Suresh Raina shots which he doles out with elan when in prime form. While he relished white-ball cricket, he couldn't replicate it in the longest version of the game. Although his Test career started with a fine century against Sri Lanka, his form fizzed away thereafter due to his imminent struggles against pace and swing. He did decently well in South Africa, which pressed the selectors persisted with him for the Nidahas Trophy and the England tour. However, he was not picked for the national side after that due to not-so-great fitness levels and others grabbing opportunities. This meant he was out of the reckoning for the 2019 World Cup as well. Raina was the first Indian player to hold a century in all three formats of the game and although red-ball cricket wasn't his cup of tea, Raina also bowls very useful right-arm off spin and was often used by Dhoni when he had to look for breakthroughs or try something different. However, he has not been bowling of late with many other options being available for the captain. When CSK faced a two-year exile after the 2015 season, Raina captained the temporary franchise Gujarat Lions as well.

Personal information

Born
27 November 1986 (age 32)
Muradnagar, Uttar Pradesh, India
Nickname
Sonu
Height
5 ft 9 in (175 cm)
Batting
Left-handed
Bowling
Right arm off break
Role
Batsman
International information
Nationality
India (2005-present)
Test debut (cap 229)
26 July 2005 v Sri Lanka
Last Test
10 January 2018 v Australia
ODI debut (cap 159)
30 July 2005 v Sri Lanka
Last ODI
17 July 2018 v England
ODI shirt no.
48 (formerly 3 and 30)
T20I debut (cap 8)
1 December 2006 v South Africa
Last T20I
8 July 2018 v England
T20I shirt no.
3
Domestic team information
Years
Team
2002/03–present
Uttar Pradesh
2008–2015
Chennai Super Kings (squad no. 3)
2016–2017
Gujarat Lions (squad no. 3)
2018–present
Chennai Super Kings (squad no. 3)


Career statistics

Competition    Test     ODI     T20I    FC
Matches           18        226      78        109
Runs scored    768      5,615   1,605   6,871
Batting average           26.18   35.31   29.18   42.15
100s/50s          1/7       5/36     1/5       14/45
Top score         120      116*    101      204*
Balls bowled   1,041   2,126   349      3,457
Wickets           13        36        13        41
Bowling average         46.38   50.30   34.00   41.97
5 wickets in innings    n/a       n/a       n/a       n/a
10 wickets in match    n/a       n/a       n/a       n/a
Best bowling   2/1       3/34     2/6       3/31
Catches/stamping      23/–     102/–   42/–     118/–
The Super Kings have lifted the IPL title thrice (in 2010, 2011 and 2018), and have the best win percentage among all teams in the IPL (61.56). They hold the records of most appearances in the IPL playoffs (nine) and in the final (seven). In addition, they have also won the Champions League Twenty20 in 2010 and 2014. The brand value of the Super Kings in 2018 was estimated at $65 million, making them the most valuable franchise in the IPL.


2. Virat Kohli

He was born in 5 November 1988) is an Indian international cricketer who currently captains the India national team. A right-handed top-order batsman, Kohli is regarded as one of the best batsmen in the world. He plays for Royal Challengers Bangalore in the Indian Premier League (IPL), and has been the team's captain since 2013. A spunky, chubby teenager with gelled hair shot to fame after leading India to glory in the Under-19 World Cup at Kuala Lumpur in early 2008. In an Indian team filled with saint-like icons worthy of their own hagiographies, Virat Kohli, with his most un-Indian, 'bad-boy' intensity, would clearly be an outcast.
Grind through the ranks
He soon joined the senior Men in Blue in Sri Lanka, come August 2008. In the absence of the regular openers, Virat Kohli was given a chance to open the batting in the ODI series. He played some commendable knocks in his extended run as an opener, as India went on to win the ODI series. However, the established and formidable pair of Tendulkar and Sehwag kept Kohli out of the team

The 20-year-old continued to impress for Delhi and dominated attacks, clearly demonstrating that he belonged at a much higher level; that junior cricket was beneath his standards. Kohli then traveled to Australia in 2009 for the Emerging players tournament and stamped his authority all over the bowling attacks. He added 'big-match temperament' to his résumé too, lacing a fluent hundred in the final against South Africa, and guiding his team to a clinical victory. The young prodigy, barely old enough to receive his man-of-the-match champagne, ended the tournament with 398 runs from 7 outings with two centuries and two fifties, ensuring that he remained fresh in the selectors' minds. Kohli was the shining light in amidst the chaos, as he stroked his way to a hundred in Adelaide exhibiting the will to improve and extraordinary focus under pressure in the searing heat and pressure of Australia. He went on a record-breaking spree in ODIs: the Indian record for the fastest to multiples-of-thousand runs in ODIs, culminating in the world record for the fastest to 9000 runs in ODIs. He was also the highest run-scorer for India in ODIs for three consecutive calendar years - 2010, 2011 and 2012 and won the ICC ODI cricketer of the year award in 2012.

Batting technique and idiosyncrasies

Kohli has a seemingly hot head on his shoulders, but he channels all his anger while he is batting. Known to be an aggressive batsman always on the lookout for runs, he has a fairly sound , albeit slightly unconventional technique, which makes him judge the length of the ball earlier than most, and amazingly quick wrists to run his hands through the ball, even against fast bowlers. He is equally adept against pace and spin, and never looks ungainly at the crease. With nimble foot-movement against the spinners, he is known to be quite destructive when the situation demands it. He has had to fill some rather big shoes of his predecessors, and has done an admirable job to say the least.

Technical Shortcomings

However, his slightly unconventional bottom-hand technique results in some technical shortcomings and lack of versatility. Kohli has dealt with swing bowling well, which is late and difficult to pick, but still less abrupt than seam bowling, which is almost unnatural and catches you off-guard. He is, without a doubt, one of the most gifted cricketers who has also worked very hard on his game and fitness. As a result, he picks the length early and has a swift and decisive backward or forward movement. However, he picks up the line early too, and as a result, reacts to it equally early. This is quite amazing in itself; however, on pitches lacking true bounce and aiding seam movement, it brings about his downfall. Virat tends to 'run his hands through the ball' beside him rather than punching it late under his line of vision.

Captaincy and a change in technique

With regular captain MS Dhoni ailing from an injury, Kohli was named stand-in captain for the first Test at Adelaide. After an abysmal tour of England, critics were skeptical of Kohli's performance in Australia in the Border-Gavaskar trophy in December. Kohli proved that they couldn't have been more wrong, as he scored two fluent hundreds in the first Test at Adelaide. His second innings master class of 141 almost pulled off a stunning run-chase on a notorious 5th day rank-turner, and went on to score a total of four hundreds on this tour. Saying that he had silenced critics would be an understatement; however, his technique of playing beside the ball, and the bat coming down from gully rather than slip continued to bother him whenever exposed to late lateral movement. As India prepared for their title defense ahead of the 2015 World Cup Down Under, with the catch phrase 'Won't give it back' doing the rounds, Virat Kohli was touted to be a key performer for India. The Indians had a terrible run in Australia, having failed to win a single match in the Test series as well as the succeeding ODI tri-series. Kohli started off in signature fashion, with a typically stroke-filled hundred against Pakistan as India maintained their unbeaten run against their arch-rivals in ICC events. As India stormed into the semi-finals unbeaten, Kohli's form continued to take an uncharacteristic dip, culminating in a painstaking 1 in the semi-final loss against the co-hosts and eventual champions, Australia. Kohli, now the full-time Test captain, toured Sri Lanka with a young side without the services of Mahendra Singh Dhoni, wary of the Sri Lankan spinners' fabled 4th innings con-job Nonetheless, the triumph took India to the No. 1 spot in the ICC Test rankings for the first time since they forfeited it to England after the forgettable white-wash in 2011.

IPL and T20 dominance

He continued his emphatic run in the T20 WC, batting (and running) like a man possessed, thrashing boundaries with ridiculous ease. Despite an 89* in the semi-final against the West Indies (extending his inhuman run of form in the format), India's bowling panicked at a crucial stage. One had to feel sorry for him as he had to make do with the 'Player of the tournament' award for the second successive T20 WC; a distinction he would've gladly exchanged for the elusive T20 WC trophy. Kohli's thirst for runs showed no signs of slowing down as he looted a small matter of 973 runs during the 2016 edition of the Indian Premier League, the most (by far) by any batsman in the history of the tournament - as he led his Royal Challengers Bangalore (RCB) franchise to a runner-up finish.

The final frontier

In the first week of 2018, Kohli went on to lead India in South Africa, a few weeks after he tied the knot with Indian actress and long-time girlfriend, Anushka Sharma. India went on to concede the series in the first two Tests, but came back to win the third Test match on a difficult wicket. In a series full of difficult wickets, Kohli exhibited tighter technique than he had in England, and batted better than he did in his more prolific tour of South Africa in 2013/14. Kohli went on to conquer his (personal) final frontier in England later in 2018 too, scoring 593 runs in 10 innings, including 2 hundreds, and not conceding his wicket to his fabled nemesis, Anderson, even once. India went on to lose the series 1-4, and Kohli's record as captain was tainted by two consecutive Test series losses away.


Personal information

Born
November 5, 1988 (age 30)
Delhi, India
Nickname
Chikoo
Height
5 ft 9 in (1.75 m)
Batting
Right-handed
Bowling
Right-arm medium
Role
India (2008–present)
Test debut (cap 269)
20 June 2011 v West Indies
Last Test
3 January 2019 v Australia
ODI debut (cap 175)
18 August 2008 v Sri Lanka
Last ODI
13 March 2019 v Australia
ODI shirt no.
18
T20I debut (cap 31)
12 June 2010 v Zimbabwe
Last T20I
27 February 2019 v Australia
T20I shirt no.
18

Career statistics

Competition    Test     ODI     T20I    T20
Matches           77        227      67        253
Runs scored    6,613   10,843 2,263   7,911
Batting average           53.76   59.57   50.28   40.98
100s/50s          25/20   41/49   0/20     4/58
Top score         243      183      90*      113
Balls bowled   163      641      146      454
Wickets           0          4          4          8
Bowling average                   166.25 49.50   82.62
5 wickets in innings    0          0          0          0
10 wickets in match    0          n/a       n/a       n/a
Best bowling             1/15     1/13     2/25
Catches/stampings      72/–     111/–   34/–     115/–
Kohli was appointed the vice-captain of the ODI team in 2012 and handed over the Test captaincy following Mahendra Singh Dhoni's Test retirement in 2014. In early 2017, he became the limited-overs captain as well after Dhoni stepped down from the position. In ODIs, Kohli holds the world record for the fastest batsman to 10,000 runs in 205 innings Kohli has the second highest number of centuries and the highest number of centuries in run-chases in the world. Kohli holds numerous Indian batting records including the fastest ODI century, the fastest batsman to 5,000 ODI runs and the fastest to 10 ODI centuries. Among the T20I world records held by Kohli are: the fastest batsman to 2,000 runs most runs in a calendar year and most fifties in the format. He also holds the records of most runs in a single tournament of both the World Twenty20 and the IPL. He currently holds the record of hitting most fours (223) in T20I with Tillakaratne DilshanHe is the only batsman in history to average over 50 in Tests, ODIs and T20Is simultaneously On 27 October 2018, he became the first batsman for India, and tenth overall, to score three successive centuries in ODIs In December 2018, Kohli became the first Asian captain to win test match in England, Australia and South Africa
Kohli has been the recipient of many awards such as the Sir Garfield Sobers Trophy (ICC Cricketer of the Year) in 2017 and 2018; ICC Test Player of the Year 2018; ICC ODI Player of the Year in 2012, 2017 and 2018 and Widen Leading Cricketer in the World in 2016, 2017. He was given the Arjuna Award in 2013, the Padma Shri under the sports category in 2017 and the Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna, the highest sporting honor in India, in 2018. Alongside his cricket career, Kohli co-owns FC Goa in the ISL, the IPTL franchise UAE Royals and the PWL team Bengaluru Yodhas. He also has other business ventures and over 20 brand endorsements. Kohli is ranked as one of the world's most famous athletes by ESPN and one of the most valuable athlete brands by Forbes In 2018, Time magazine named Kohli one of the 100 most influential people in the world

3. Rohit Sharma

He is born 30 April 1987 is an Indian international cricketer who is the vice-captain of the India national team in limited-over formats. He is a right-handed batsman and was an occasional right-arm off break bowler. He plays for Mumbai in domestic cricket and captains Mumbai Indians in the Indian Premier League.

Talent 

 an apparently heartening term that has followed Rohit Sharma around like a shadow; even haunted him at times. It seems to be a burden that the cricketing fraternity has enforced upon him and, after more than a decade in the national setting, he has been weighed down by the label. It all began after an injury to an in-form Yuvraj Singh in the 2007 T20 WC, when Rohit was called upon as a last-minute emergency replacement to play a league game against the hosts. After a lackluster start to the Indian innings, the 20-year-old strode out into Kings mead and stroked his way to a fluent half-century against the likes of Pollock, Ntini and Morkel as though he were having a net session. He went one step further in the final of the tournament and showed startling maturity under pressure to survive till the end of the innings, escorting India to a respectable total that they ultimately defended, knocking South Africa out of the tournament in their own backyard. Rohit Sharma was touted to be the Great Sachin Tendulkar's long-destined successor at number 4 in the Test batting line-up. After all, it added up: so much time to play his shots, effortless stroke-making capabilities even against express pace, and a wide repertoire of shots. This had to be God's gift to cricket in the post-Tendulkar era, right. Rohit was subsequently picked for the ODI team on a selection whim after his burst of vital performances in the T20 WC and his impressive Ranji Trophy record. He made an impression in the CB series Down Under, playing some crucial cameos against stalwarts like Brett Lee and Stuart Clark, and a more-than-competent Sri Lankan attack. These inspired away performances in the T20 WC and the CB series caught the eye of the selectors, and warranted him an extended run with the limited-over’s side. However, inconsistency and a knack of gifting his wicket away meant that he struggled to cement his spot in the side. Critics pointed out that he had too many shots for the same ball, and this meant that shot selection was becoming a bit of an issue for him. Furthermore, several experts spotted that he had trouble playing the short ball since his stance was too side-on and that he had no back-and-across trigger movement. His pedestrian batting average of 22 to go with a string of low scores and unconverted starts meant that he failed to cement a spot in the side for the 2011 Cricket World Cup squad. Looking back at his career, Rohit Sharma would have the Indian Premier League to thank for keeping him in the reckoning and not being discarded liked several other young and talented cricketers who burst forth into national reckoning but couldn't make it big at the highest level. In the first two years of the IPL, his performance stood out, as he made over 350 runs each time for the Deccan Chargers and proved his worth to his franchise. He was then transferred to the Mumbai Indians franchise in 2011 and has been one of their most consistent batsmen over the years. He was subsequently ruled out of the series in a gut-wrenching turn of events, and wouldn't get another opportunity to prove his Test credentials for another 4 years. Rohit's proved himself on the IPL stage again in 2011 and made a comeback ODI squad for the tour of West Indies where he scored three half-centuries in five matches. However, this turned out to be another false dawn as he followed it up with a string of low scores in the CB series in Australia and a nightmare tour of Sri Lanka with 14 runs in 5 innings, including 2 ducks. He had already been given a more-than-extended run and was starting to build an unenviable reputation of a frustratingly fascinating player.
Rohit – at long last – started to live up to it. In a run-fest of an ODI series against Australia, Rohit scored 491 runs in 6 outings, culminating in a violent 209 in the deciding ODI in Bangalore, joining a crème de la crème list of ODI double-centurions that comprised of Sachin Tendulkar and Virender Sehwag. With the retirements of stalwarts like Rahul Dravid and VVS Laxman, a new crop of Test batsmen needed to be honed, and opened up new avenues in the team. Rohit, at long last, earned the oh-so-desirable India Test cap against West Indies in the first Test at the Eden Gardens in his fabled 'predecessor's' farewell series. Rohit wasn't going to let this opportunity go begging and embraced the Test arena immediately, easing his way to a typically Rohit-esque 177 in his debut innings; a vital innings in the context of the match, dragging the momentum India's way. He reinforced his metaphorical statement to the selectors with an unbeaten 111 in the following Test, enchanting a tearful Winched in Sachin Tendulkar's farewell Test match and taming the West Indian bowling attack. After an injury-break, Rohit, as if to make up for lost time, ripped apart a hapless Sri Lankan attack on his way to a jaw-dropping 264 – wait for it – in an ODI at the Eden Gardens, making thirteen runs more than the entire Lankan team managed. He was picked after his 209 for the South Africa tour in late 2013 and looked technically inept in seaming conditions, committing to the line of the ball too early and playing as if it were a true wicket. His strength of picking the length early in ODIs was turning into a curse in Test matches. Similarly, having been picked for the tour of Australia on the back of his 264, he made just one fifty in 6 innings, looking completely at sea against the pace-heavy Australian attack, continuously playing away from the body, trying to hit through the line in conditions conducive to lateral movement and showing poor off-stump awareness.
Nevertheless he continued his golden run in ODIs, ending the 2015 World Cup campaign as India's second-highest run-scorer with a total of 330 runs, with including a hundred in the quarter-final against Bangladesh to go with two fifties.

Rohit, the ODI player, finally delivered a break-through performance as an opener with an impeccable limited-overs tour of Australia in early 2016, making back-to-back hundreds and a 99 in the series and finally answering the faith of the selectors and his captain. He had become a one-day monster who developed a habit started his ODI innings in a slow and steady manner, but could really lay into any bowling attack once he was in. With an extended home season, Rohit continued to get chances in Tests and showed vast improvement in his technique, playing closer to his body and preventing his ODI game to amalgamate with his more air-tight Test technique. With four fifties and a hundred in his last 5 innings, he capped off a fruitful home season with an unprecedented third ODI double-century against a woebegone Sri Lankan attack.
Eerily enough, Rohit has once again been picked for the Test series in South Africa based on his performances at home. With the vexatious pattern of getting picked for away tours based on home performances, and no county stints in his CV, Rohit would be looking forward to correcting the glaring blemish in his record – Test performances outside the subcontinent. With Ajinkya Rahane, one of the most complete batsmen in the side, breathing down his neck, Rohit Sharma must be swift in grabbing his Test opportunities, or he could soon find himself on the bench. His ODI performance, nonetheless, has been improving by leaps and bounds, as he caps off a laudable 2017 with 1293 runs and 6 centuries. A more technically sound batsman now, Rohit has shown improvement against the red ball with better awareness of his off-stump, a more compact technique, and a higher degree of patience. However, unless he is able to convert his ability into overseas runs, his tale will continue to be one that makes you wonder what could have been.



Personal information

Full name
Rohit Gurunath Sharma
Born
30 April 1987 (age 31)
Nagpur, Maharashtra, India
Nickname
Hitman, Mr. Talented, Shaana, Ro
Height
5 ft 8 in (1.73 m)
Batting
Right-handed
Bowling
Right-arm off break
Role
Top-Order Batsman, Vice-captain (ODI and T20I)
International information
National side
India (2007–present)
Test debut (cap 280)
6 November 2013 v West Indies
Last Test
26 December 2018 v Australia
ODI debut (cap 168)
23 June 2007 v Ireland
Last ODI
13 March 2019 v Australia
ODI shirt no.
45
T20I debut (cap 17)
19 September 2007 v England
Last T20I
24 February 2019 v Australia
T20I shirt no.
45
Domestic team information
Years
Team
2006/07–present
Mumbai
2008–2010
Deccan Chargers (squad no. 45)
2011–present
Mumbai Indians (squad no. 45)
Career statistics
Competition
Test
ODI
T20I
T20
Matches
27
206
93
300
Runs scored
1,585
8010
2,326
7,809
Batting average
39.62
47.4
32.90
32.26
100s/50s
3/10
22/41
4/16
6/53
Top score
177
264
118
118
Balls bowled
334
593
68
628
Wickets
2
8
1
29
Bowling average
101.00
64.37
113.00
28.17
5 wickets in innings
0
0
0
0
10 wickets in match
0
n/a
n/a
n/a
Best bowling
1/26
2/27
1/22
4/6
Catches/stamping
25/–
73/–
35/–
122/–
Having started his international career at the age of 20, Sharma quickly came to be pegged by many analysts as a permanent fixture in the Indian cricket team in the next decade. He made his ODI debut on 23 June 2007 against Ireland In CT 2013, he started playing as an opening batsman for India ODI team and performed consistently. He scored consecutive centuries in his first two Test matches against the West Indies in November 2013, scoring 177 at the Eden Gardens in Kolkata on debut, followed by a score of 111* in the next Test at the Wankhede Stadium in Mumbai. He played 108 ODIs before playing his maiden Test.
On 13 November 2014, Rohit Sharma scored 264 against Sri Lanka at Eden Gardens, Kolkata, which is the highest individual score in ODIs and second in overall limited 50 over match. He has also scored 106 against South Africa in Twenty20 Internationals and became the second Indian to score a century in all three formats. He also won "T20 Innings of the Year Award" by ESPNCricinfo. He is also the fastest batsman to score 100(35 balls) in T-20 against Sri Lanka. He then became the only player in the world to score three double hundreds in ODIs. Rohit Sharma is the first skipper to lead his team to the IPL title thrice. As per Forbes India 2015 Top 100 celebrities in India, Sharma is listed 8th in terms of fame, 46th in terms of income and 12th overall. In November 2018, he became the first cricketer to score four centuries in T20 international cricket.
Mumbai Indians are currently captained by Rohit Sharma. Mahela Jayawardene was appointed as head coach of Mumbai Indians before the 2017 season. Sharma is the leading run scorer of the team while Lasith Malinga is the leading wicket taker of the team and the IPL as well.

4. Gautam Gambhir

He was born 14 October 1981) is an Indian politician and former Indian cricketer, who played all formats of the game. He is a left-handed opening batsman who played domestic cricket for Delhi, and captained Kolkata Knight Riders and Delhi Daredevils in the Indian Premier League (IPL). He made his One Day International (ODI) debut against Bangladesh in 2003, and played his first Test the following year against Australia. He captained the Indian team in six ODIs from late-2010 to late-2011 with India winning all six matches. He played an integral part in India's wins in the finals of both the 2007 World Twenty20 (75 runs from 54 balls) and the 2011 Cricket World Cup (97 from 122). Gautam Gambhir's cricketing career has all the trappings of a typical Bollywood flick- the glamour, the drama, the passion, the chutzpah, the wrangles, and of course the proverbial ache din and bure din. Gambhir's journey as a first-class cricketer began in the 1999-2000 season. But, it was a couple of years later, in 2002, that the Delhi lad first stole the spotlight. Then playing for the Board President's XI against a touring Zimbabwe team, the left-hander smashed a double century scoring 218 runs. A year later, came the big moment: Gambhir secured his place in the Indian team for the TVS Cup, a triangular fixture. Not as gifted as some of his contemporaries, initially Gambhir had to grin and bear it when selectors would just choose to overlook him. However, what separated him from the pack was his passion for the game and an almost insatiable appetite for runs. At the topmost level, the stakes are high. Bowlers keep an eye out for even the minutest of shortcomings in the best of batsmen. And Gambhir had a chink in his otherwise formidable armor: His front foot would fall over a bit, which often made him an easy LBW prey to quality fast bowlers. This flaw in the technique proved to be the recurrent glitch that kept his bat quiet between 2003 and 2006. Having fixed the fault, Gambhir was again in the reckoning, scoring enough to stake a claim for a place in India's 2007 ODI World Cup squad. But, the selectors thought otherwise. They preferred to instead go with hard-hitting right-hander Robin Uthappa, who had, under his belt, some match-winning knocks at the top of the order. The rejection severely jolted Gambhir, who even contemplated quitting the game. But, destiny had other plans in store for him. The same year in September, Gambhir was called back to open the batting with his Delhi mate Virender Sehwag for the T-20 World Cup. He grabbed the opportunity with both hands. In the high-voltage final against Pakistan, Gambhir showed nerves of steel scoring 75 runs that made all the difference. He was the second highest scorer in the tournament with 227 runs in the 7 innings. After that feat, Gambhir always enjoyed the backing of skipper MS Dhoni, but failed to break into the team. It was sheer hard luck, as legends of the game like Tendulkar still graced the Indian top-order.
Gambhir was on the top of his game between 2008 and 2011. Always looking aggressive on the field, he hit the purple patch in those years scoring big and often match-winning knocks. In the 2008 CB series Down Under, Gambhir blazed a trail when he outscored the likes of Sachin, Ponting and Sangakara to emerge as the highest run-scorer of that ODI tri-series. Soon, Gambhir cemented his place in the ODI team, filling the big shoes of iconic left-hander Sourav Ganguly. The spectacular showing in the ODIs, earned him a place in the Test team, too. Having scored his first Test century against Bangladesh at Chittagong in 2004 , it took Gambhir almost four years to score his second test ton. But the third one came only nine days after. Of his 9 test centuries, the one he scored at Napier in New Zealand in 2009 will be remembered for long. Batting for a staggering 643 minutes, Gambhir showed grit deploying his stoic defence and scoring a match-saving 137 runs. By 2009, Gambhir had established himself as one of the top batsmen in International cricket. The same year, he received the prestigious ICC Test Cricketer of The Year award. Two years later, his decisive knock in the final of the 2011 ODI World Cup, which India won, made him a national hero of sorts.

Post 

2011 World Cup, many even saw Gambhir as next-in-line to MS Dhoni. But then came the slide in his fortunes. One bad series was followed by another, runs dried up and questions begun to be asked of his technique. In the 17 Test matches between 2011 and 2012, he averaged just 31. Eventually, he faced the axe. Between 2007 and 2011, Gambhir had done enough with the bat to stamp his name in bold letters in the history of Indian cricket as one of the best left-handed batsmen to have played for India across all formats. In 2014 and 2016, Gambhir made two short comebacks to the test team, but could never simply get his act together. During this phase, even though Gambhir was struggling in the International arena, he was among the most valued players in the IPL. KKR paid a handsome sum of Rs 11 crore in the IPL auction in 2011. Taking up the cudgels, Gambhir revamped the fortune of a struggling team, leading them to famous IPL title wins in 2012 and 2014. Now, in the 2018, Gambhir will again be seen in action with Delhi Daredevils.



Personal information

Born
14 October 1981 (age 37)
New Delhi, India
Nickname
Gauti
Height
5 ft 6 in (1.68 m)
Batting
Left-handed
Bowling
Right-arm leg breaks
Role
Batsman
International information
National side
India (2003-2018)
Test debut (cap 249)
3 November 2004 v Australia
Last Test
9 November 2016 v England
ODI debut (cap 149)
11 April 2003 v Bangladesh
Last ODI
27 January 2013 v England
ODI shirt no.
5
T20I debut (cap 12)
13 September 2007 v Scotland
Last T20I
28 December 2012 v Pakistan
Domestic team information
Years
Team
1999/00–2018
Delhi
2008–2010, 2018
Delhi Daredevils
2011–2017
Kolkata Knight Riders
Career statistics
Competition
Test
ODI
T20I
LA
Matches
58
147
37
283
Runs scored
4,154
5,238
932
9,385
Batting average
41.95
39.68
27.41
36.51
100s/50s
9/22
11/34
-/7
19/57
Top score
206
150*
75
150*
Balls bowled
12
6
37
Wickets
0
1
Bowling average
36.00
5 wickets in innings
0
10 wickets in match
n/a
Best bowling
1/7
Catches/stampings
38/–
36/–
11/–
68/–
Member of Bhartiya Janta Party
In October 2018, during the quarter-finals of the 2018–19 Vijay Hazare Trophy, he scored his 10,000th run in List A cricket. In December 2018, he announced his retirement from all forms of cricket. On March 22, 2019 he joined Bharatiya Janata Party. The Delhi Capitals are a franchise cricket team that represents the city of Delhi in the Indian Premier League (IPL). Founded in 2008 as Delhi Daredevils (DD), the franchise is owned by the GMR Group and JSW Group. The team's home ground is Feroz Shah Kotla Ground which is in New Delhi.
Ahead of the 2018 IPL, 60% of the franchise ownership was transferred to the JSW Group. In December 2018, the team changed its name from the Delhi Daredevils to the Delhi Capitals. Giving the rationale behind the change of the team's name, Co-Owner and Chairman Parth Jindal said, "Delhi is the power centre of the country, it is the capital, therefore the name Delhi Capitals." Co-Owner Kiran Kumar Grandhi said, "The new name symbolizes Delhi’s identity and just like the city, we are aiming to be the centre of all action going forward."
The Delhi Capitals have never appeared in an Indian Premier League final, and last qualified for the IPL playoffs in 2012. The leading run-scorer for the Capitals is Virender Sehwag, while the leading wicket-taker is Amit Mishra.

5.Robin Venu Uthappa

Robin Ben Uthappa was born 11 November 1985) is an Indian cricketer. He plays for Karnataka in domestic cricket and Kolkata Knight Riders in the IPL. The ramp shot at the Oval against England in 2007, the walking hit over the bowler's head and then his improvised batting are the first thoughts that come into one's mind when you look at the name Robin Uthappa. A well built lad from Karnataka, Uthappa first came into the limelight after a good show in the 2005 Challenger Series playing for India-B. He also did well in the subsequent Challenger Series in 2006. All this came at a time when the national selectors where looking for some young blood and Uthappa was roped into the India ODI squad to play against England at home. Uthappa had a dream debut as he scored a well compiled 86, opening the innings at Indore. He was given a decent run since then and was also part of the 50-over World Cup squad in 2007. The action shifted to South Africa for the inaugural edition of the T20 WC the same year and Uthappa had a good beginning before fading away. However, he played all the matches in the tournament, which was won by India. However, his form dipped after the Asia Cup in 2008 and with the emergence of Virat Kohli, Uthappa was overlooked by the selectors. He returned to domestic circuit and also played all the editions of the IPL since its inception in 2008. He represented the Mumbai Indian in 2008, then moved to Royal Challengers Bangalore in 2009 before being roped in by Pune Warriors in 2011. He was bought by Kolkata Knight Riders at the 2014 auctions. By far, IPL-7 has been Uthappa's best season so far. Though he didn't get off to a great start, he picked up pace and went on to score 660 runs in the tournament, to become the highest run-scorer overall for the 2014 season. He also made history by becoming the only player in the world to score 40 or more runs in ten consecutive T20 matches. This came after a good 2013-14 season for Karnataka despite missing out on a few matches early in the season. He had done enough to convince the national selectors again and he was picked for India again after six years for the tour of Bangladesh in 2014.



Personal information


Full name
Robin Venu Uthappa
Born
11 November 1985 (age 33)
Kodagu, Karnataka, India
Height
5 ft 7 in (1.70 m)
Batting
Right-handed
Bowling
Right-arm medium
Role
Batsman, wicketkeeper
International information
National side
India
ODI debut (cap 165)
15 April 2006 v England
Last ODI
14 July 2015 v Zimbabwe
ODI shirt no.
37 (formerly 17)
T20I debut (cap 13)
13 September 2007 v Scotland
Last T20I
30 March 2012 v South Africa
Domestic team information
Years
Team
2002/03–2016/17
Karnataka
2008
Mumbai Indians
2009–2010
Royal Challengers Bangalore
2011–2013
Pune Warriors India
2014–present
Kolkata Knight Riders
2017-18
Saurashtra
Career statistics
Competition
ODI
T20I
FC
LA
Matches
46
13
96
145
Runs scored
934
249
6,316
5,090
Batting average
25.94
24.9
40.48
39.15
100s/50s
0/5
0/1
14/37
2/0
Top score
86
50
162
20
Balls bowled
673
5
Wickets
12
0
Bowling average
34.91
51.20
5 wickets in innings
0
0
10 wickets in match
0
0
Best bowling
3/26
2/19
Catches/stumpings
15/-
1/-
86/1
68/-

Uthappa made his One Day International debut in the seventh and final match of the English tour of India in April 2006. He had a successful debut, making 86 as an opening batsman before being dismissed run out. It was the highest score for an Indian debutant in a limited-overs match. He is nicknamed 'The Walking Assassin' for his tactic of charging the bowler. He played an important role in India's win at the 2007 ICC World Twenty20. He finished the 2014–15 Ranji Trophy season as the highest run scorer that season.
The Kolkata Knight Riders (also known by the acronym KKR) are a franchise cricket team representing the city of Kolkata in the Indian Premier League. The franchise is owned by Bollywood actor Shahrukh Khan, actress Juhi Chawla and her spouse Jay Mehta. The team is coached by Jacques Kallis. The home of the Knight Riders is Eden Gardens, the largest cricket stadium in India and the second largest in the world by seating capacity. Kolkata Knight Riders

Indian Premier League
Personnel
Captain
Dinesh Karthik
Coach
Jacques Kallis
Owner
Shah Rukh Khan (Red Chillies Entertainment)
Juhi Chawla, Jay Mehta (Mehta Group)
Team information
City
Kolkata, West Bengal, India

 Founded
2008
Home ground
Eden Gardens
Capacity
68,000
History
Indian Premier League wins
2 (2012, 2014)

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